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Programs & conversations          Tacoma Reads Together 2014

Saturday, October 11
"Take This Job And Shove It" Storytelling Workshop
10 a.m.-Noon
Wheelock Library
A bad job, a cranky boss or outrageous co-workers can be the source of an entertaining and enlightening story. On the other hand, talking about them could also just sound like complaining. How do you relate a memorable experience in a way that an audience will enjoy, and even learn something?

Megan Sukys and Tad Monroe produce Tacoma's live storytelling show, Drunken Telegraph. For this workshop, they will bring simple and effective tools to help participants craft a compelling tale about real-life events. Participants are invited to come prepared to share a 2-3 minute story from their own work lives.

Megan and Tad will select a few storytellers from the workshop to take part in a special follow-up performance on Tuesday, October 14, 2014. Registration required.


Saturday, October 11
Restoring the American Dream A Community Conversation on Big Money, Inequality and the Average Voter
(A partnership between the Tacoma Public Library and the University of Washington Tacoma)
10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Olympic Room, Main Library
At the heart of the American Dream is a country where there is opportunity to be able to support ourselves and our families and to pursue educational and economic success. It is a country with a system of just laws and a government of the people, by the people and for the people. That dream has never been perfect, but it is what we strive for and work to improve across this nation.

Over the past 30 years that foundation has weakened. Too few people have control over the resources and opportunities that should be available to all. Americans are losing their freedom. Ordinary citizens must rebuild that American Dream. Our future depends on it.

The loss of the American Dream has affected everyone, but in many different ways: Income inequality, job loss, reduced access to education, loss of homes, loss of personal rights, loss of privacy, and loss of ability to shape our own future. Mark M. McDermott is the featured speaker.


Tuesday, October 14
Drunken Telegraph "Take This Job And Shove It"

7 -8 p.m.
Olympic Room, Main Library
Overhead the drunken telegraph, telephone and electric-light wires tangled on tottering posts whose butts were half whittled through by the knife of the loafer.
               - Rudyard Kipling describing Tacoma in 1889

Drunken Telegraph is Tacoma's live storytelling show, bringing people together to share real-life stories that build community - or at least make for a damn fine evening.

For this special show, co-producers Megan Sukys and Tad Monroe will offer a lineup of local people sharing true stories about tackling thankless jobs, handling outrageous bosses and surviving the worst work situations. Entertaining and authentic, the stories also offer insight into what it really takes to make a living.

Saturday, October 18
Paycheck to Paycheck: The life & times of Katrina Gilbert
2:30 - 4 p.m.
Olympic Room, Main Library
From Maria Shiver's groundbreaking multi-platform project "The Shriver Report: A Woman's Nation Pushes Back from the Brink," PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK: THE LIFE & TIMES OF KATRINA GILBERT tells the moving story of a year in the life of one mother whose daily struggles illuminate the challenges faced by more than 42 million American women and the 28 million children who depend on them. Directed and produced by Shari Cookson and Nick Doob (HBO's Emmy®-winning "The Memory Loss Tapes") and executive produced by Peabody and Emmy® winner Maria Shriver (HBO's "The Alzheimer's Project") and HBO's Sheila Nevins, the film is the unvarnished account of a single mom struggling to get ahead, but constantly getting knocked back by a system that almost seems designed to see her fail. Presented in cooperation with HBO.

Tuesday, October 21
An evening with Barbara Ehrenreich, author of Nickel & Dimed (in conversation with Amanda Westbrooke)
7 p.m.
Olympic Room, Main Library
Barbara Ehrenreich
is the author of Nickel and Dimed, Blood Rites, The Worst Years of Our Lives (a New York Times bestseller), Fear of Falling, which was nominated for a National Book Critics Circle Award, and eight other books. A frequent contributor to Time, Harper’s, Esquire, The New Republic, Mirabella, The Nation, and The New York Times Magazine, she lives near Key West, Florida.

Amanda Westbrooke is the popular host of TV Tacoma’s CityLine.

Saturday, October 25
El Norte1
1 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Olympic Room, Main Library
This ambitious drama tells the story of an impoverished brother and sister, manual laborers who receive woefully inadequate compensation for their work. The plot kick-starts after they hightail it to California, narrowly escaping death at the hands of the Guatemalan army, who are scorching any Mayan-speaking village they encounter. Initially, their long trek north proves fruitful, but the film's subversive message illustrates the myriad forms exploitation takes, which Nava depicts most vividly in the devastating final 30 minutes. (Spanish, w/ subtitles)

Tuesday, October 28
Nickel & Dimed: A staged reading
7 p.m - 8:30 p.m.
Olympic Room, Main Library
Local actors bring Barbara Ehrenreich’s compelling book alive on stage. Adapted for the stage by Joan Holden, the play made its world premiere on July 26, 2002 at Seattle’s Intiman Theatre.

Wednesday, October 29
Washington's minimum wage conundrum
A Community Conversation
7 p.m.
Olympic Room, Main Library
The battle to increase the minimum wage is everywhere, from global fast food worker protests and new local minimum wage laws to executive orders and passionate speeches by politicians. What is the impact of raising the minimum wage on workers and businesses?  Will it substantively address rising inequality and the broad decline of the middle class or, as some assert, result in more youth unemployment, higher prices and increased automation.  Let’s talk about it.

Wednesday, October 29
Book Discussion
Wednesday, October 29 @ 7 p.m.
There is so much to talk about after reading Barbara Ehrenreich’s book - the minimum wage, income inequity, the slow death of the American dream,  and the destruction of America’s middle class. What are your thoughts after reading this book? Join us for a compelling discussion moderated  by Reference Librarian Rhonda Kristoff.